COACHING – HOME

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TEACHING AND PRIVATE COACHING
 
 
 
Here you’ll find info about Lee’s teaching and coaching activities. To find out about his creative endeavors, including writing and film production, please click HERE or on the LMC CREATIVE tab above.

Regarded for over 25 years as one of the country’s best acting teachers, Lee has taught at numerous institutions, including NYU, The Atlantic Theater Co., Miami’s New World School of the Arts, The Relativity School,  and the Screen Actor’s Guild Conservatory.

In addition to ongoing LA classes, Lee also coaches actors in person, and via Skype or Facetime. His students work regularly in all media.

UPCOMING SEMINARS: ORLANDO, VANCOUVER, MIAMI, NEW YORK CITY, AND ATLANTA. FOR MORE INFO CLICK HERE 
 
FOR INFO ON LEE’S LOS ANGELES CLASSES CLICK HERE
 
FOR INFO ON IN-PERSON AND SYKPE COACHING CLICK HERE

STATEMENT OF TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

“The Practical Aesthetics acting technique is founded on the principle that the challenge for the actor is to bring to the stage “the life of the human soul,” and that the purpose of every individual element of a theatrical production is to simply and truthfully tell the story. For the actor, the core elements of his technique must be practical, repeatable and universally applicable. Thus, the principles of correct stage action, and living “in the moment” form the cornerstones of the actor’s technique, along with the development of his voice and body.  The study of acting is both rigorous and joyful, and I work to combine those two seemingly disparate, but for the actor inextricably linked, elements in my day-to-day work in the classroom, as well as my work as a director. Life is short; the theater, for all its higher values, should be a place of delight for both its practitioners as well as the audience.”

David Mamet’s Intro to A Practical Handbook for the Actor

To the Student Actor: I know that you are dedicated and eager – eager to learn, eager to believe, eager to find a way to bring that art that you feel in yourself to the stage. You are legitimately willing to sacrifice, and you think that the sacrifice required of you is a subjugation to the will of a teacher. But a more exacting sacrifice is required: you must follow the dictates of your common sense.

Stanislavski once wrote that you should “play well or badly, but play truly.” It is not up to you whether your performance will be brilliant – all that is under your control is your intention. It is not under your control whether your career will be brilliant – all that is under your control is your intention.

If you intend to manipulate, to show, to impress, you may experience mild suffering and pleasant triumphs. If you intend to follow the truth you feel in yourself – to follow your common sense and force your will to serve you in the quest for discipline and simplicity – you will subject yourself to profound despair, loneliness, and constant self-doubt. And if you persevere, the Theatre, which you are learning to serve, will grace you, now and then, with the greatest exhilaration it is possible to know.

David Mamet 
Cabot, Vermont 1985